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Remuneration, Reward and Recognition

There are sizeable pockets of discontent with the remuneration and on-the-job rewards and recognition Canadians receive.

 

The Canadian Education and Research Institute for Counselling (CERIC) has released findings of a survey conducted by Environics Research Group asking Canadians about their job satisfaction, their perceptions about their workplaces and performance management, and the tools and resources they turn to when looking for a job or building a career. This project is a follow-up to a benchmark initiative completed in 2007 that asked similar questions. This article is an excerpt from the 2011 survey report.

The 2010 CERIC survey asked Canadians the degree to which they are satisfied with the level of remuneration, reward and recognition they receive on the job. Few Canadians are convinced they receive a fair amount of reward and recognition for the work they do.

Remuneration. The 2010 CERIC survey finds that Canadians express mixed feelings about how they are paid. Just two in ten (21%) say they strongly agree they are paid a fair amount for the work they do, followed by a larger, less certain group of Canadians (40%) who somewhat agree they are paid a fair amount. Fully four in ten disagree somewhat (25%) or strongly (14%) that they are paid a fair amount for the work they do.

 paid fair

Q.5a Please indicate how strongly you agree or disagree with the following statements…
Subsample: Those who are employed full-time or part-time.

Similar proportions of Canadians across socio-demographic groups feel they are paid a fair amount for the work they do. But fewer Canadians with lower household incomes feel this way. Seven in ten (72%) of those with household incomes of $150,000 or more feel they are paid a fair amount, compared to only four in ten (40%) of those with household incomes of less than $30,000. In addition, Canadians born in Canada (22%) are twice as likely as those born outside Canada (10%) to strongly agree they are paid a fair amount, although similar proportions agree overall.

Reward. Fully half of Canadians do not feel adequately rewarded for their efforts at work. When prompted with the statement “I don’t feel my efforts are rewarded the way they should be,” five in ten somewhat (35%) or strongly (18%) agree.

Canadians’ views of how they are rewarded for their efforts are largely consistent across age, gender, education and regional groups. However, visible minority Canadians (65%) and those with an activity-limiting disability (64%) are more likely than other Canadians to not feel their efforts are rewarded the way they should be, as are those in office-, trade- and service-oriented occupations.

Recognition. Canadians are similarly divided as to whether or not they feel they receive adequate recognition for doing a good job. A small majority of Canadians somewhat (40%) or strongly (17%) agree they receive the recognition they should when they do a good job. But for a large minority of Canadians, recognition is less evident – four in ten somewhat (28%) or strongly (13%) disagree they receive the recognition they should when they do a good job.

 recognition

Q5.3 Please indicate how strongly you agree or disagree with the following statements – When I do a good job, I receive the recognition for it that I should receive.
Subsample: Employed full-time or part-time.

Younger Canadians aged 18 to 24 are more inclined to feel they receive the recognition they should, as are those in management occupations (71% agree they receive the recognition they should, compared to 57% of those in other occupations). Canadians who feel their workplaces are inclusive are most likely to feel they receive the recognition they should.

Finally, visible minority Canadians are among the least convinced they receive the recognition they should when they do a good job – 47 percent agree they receive the recognition they should, compared to 59 percent of non-visible minority Canadians.

Read the full report, “On-line survey on public perceptions about career development and the workplace”, on the CERIC website.

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