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/ Listing Tags / Skills Development

A Skills Beyond School Commentary on Canada

This commentary is one of a series of country reports on postsecondary vocational education and training (VET) in OECD countries, prepared as part of an OECD study. The series includes reviews, involving an in-depth analysis of a country system leading to a set of policy recommendations backed by analysis.

Aligning Skill Development to Labour Market Need

This report explores the contradiction of rising levels of educational attainment coexisting with weak alignment between skills and labour market needs.

Although Three in Four (74%) Employers Believe Essential Skills Are Strategically Relevant to Their Business, Only Three in Ten (31%) Would Like to Provide Training in These Skills

A new survey conducted by Ipsos Reid on behalf of ABC Life Literacy Canada reveals that while employers realize the importance of essential skills to their business, not many are willing to invest and provide training for such skills for their employees.

Better Skills, Better Jobs, Better Lives: A Strategic Approach to Skills Policies

The OECD Skills Strategy provides an integrated, cross-government strategic framework to help countries understand more about how to invest in skills in a way that will transform lives and drive economies. 

Building Skills Together: A Report from Provincial and Territorial Labour Market Ministers

This report details the critical importance of skills and training; the success of the current programming under Labour Market Agreements; and concerns about the federal Canada Job Grant proposal.

Canadian Views on the Importance of Internet Access and Basic Computer Skills to the Economy

Nearly four in five Canadians (78%) agree providing more skills in technology and the Internet could help Canadian workers be more productive, according to a new poll from Ipsos Reid and the .CA Community Investment Program. The study coincides with the launch of the 2015 .CA Community Investment Program, which funds projects designed to improve internet access and the online experience for Canadians nationwide.

Career Ladders at One: The Guide Book

Career Ladders at One: The Guide Book builds on the experience of Essential Skills Ontario (ESO) and our partners, Literacy Link South Central (LLSC), the Literacy Network of Durham Region (LiNDR) and Literacy Northwest (LNW), in the first phase of our work at testing the implementation of career ladders in Ontario, as well as incorporates research on career ladder processes in other jurisdictions.

Competence IS THE Best Credential

Canada has one of the best-educated, most highly credentialed workforces in the world – but that doesn’t mean it is the most competent. In a world where competencies are the new credentials, Canadian workers could become even better at their jobs if we took some lessons from other jurisdictions. Slow adoption of competency frameworks is creating missed opportunities.

Creating Futureproof Graduates

Creating Futureproof Graduates is a unique toolkit of resources created by Birmingham City University to help students develop a number of key skills which aren’t always addressed in the curriculum but which employers tell us are needed, giving students the ‘edge’ in the marketplace.

Dancing with Robots: Human Skills for Computerized Work

In 2005, Professors Frank Levy and Richard J. Murnane, published the ground-breaking book The New Division of Labor: How Computers are Creating the New Job Market. Levy and Murnane’s work provided a framework for Essential Skills Ontario’s analysis on the changing nature of entry level employment discussed in Menial No More: Advancing our Workforce through Digital Skills. Levy and Murane have updated their previous work in the recent Third Way paper, Dancing with Robots: Human Skills for Computerized Work. The paper also explores larger employment and economic implications with a call for revitalization in what is considered foundational skills.

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