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/ Listing Categories / Health and Disability

Content in this category pertains to material about the workforce participation of persons with a health concern (i.e. chronic condition or disease) and/or those with either physical or non-physical impairments.

A profile of persons with disabilities among Canadians aged 15 years or older, 2012

This report uses data from the 2012 Canadian Survey on Disability (CSD) to present a profile of disability in Canada, with a particular focus on selected sociodemographic characteristics, such as age, sex, severity, education, employment, and income as well as on the use of aids and assistive devices, transportation, and the unmet needs of persons with disabilities.

A Profile of the Labour Market Experiences of Adults with Disabilities among Canadians aged 15 years or older, 2012

Using data from the 2012 Canadian Survey on Disability (CSD), this report examines the labour market experiences of people with disabilities. The CSD data offer opportunities for analysis of disability-specific aspects of employment, such as barriers encountered by people with disabilities, workplace accommodations needed and whether those needs are met, perceptions of disability-related discrimination in the work environment, and labour force discouragement among those who are neither working nor looking for work. This report aims to provide information to employers, and to spark further research in the area of disability and employment.

A Snapshot of Family Caregiving and Work in Canada

At some point in our lives, there is a high likelihood that each of us will provide care to someone we know – and receive care ourselves. Family members are typically the first to step up to provide, manage and sometimes pay for this care. Families are highly adaptable and most of the time people find ways to manage their multiple work and family responsibilities, obligations and commitments. However, juggling work and care can sometimes involve a great deal of time, energy and financial resources, and employers can play an important role in facilitating this care through accommodation, innovation and flexibility. In A Snapshot of Family Caregiving and Work in Canada, we explore some of the family realities and trends that shape the “landscape of care” across the country. This resource highlights how our family, care and work responsibilities intersect, interact and have an impact on each other.

A Snapshot of Workplace Mental Health in Canada

This edition of the Vanier Institute of the Family Statistical Snapshots series explores mental health, families and work – three key parts of our lives that intersect and interact in complex ways that affect our well-being. At some point in our lives, we are all affected by mental illness, whether through personal experience or that of a family member, friend, neighbour or colleague. Mental health conditions can have a significant impact on individuals, but they can also “trickle up” to have a detrimental effect on workplaces, communities, the economy and society at large – no one remains untouched. It is therefore vital that support for mental health be multi-faceted and every bit as prevalent as the conditions it seeks to address.

Canadian Survey on Disability

The Canadian Survey on Disability collects information about adults whose everyday activities are limited due to a condition or health-related problem. The data will be used to plan and evaluate services, programs and policies. The survey is sponsored by Employment and Social Development Canada. Your contribution could benefit Canadians with activity limitations to help ensure their full participation in society. Your information may also be used by Statistics Canada for other statistical and research purposes.

Canadian Survey on Disability, 2012

According to data from the 2012 Canadian Survey on Disability, over 7% of Canadians aged 15 years and older, or about 1,971,800 people, reported having a mobility disability that limited their daily activities. They are among the 3.8 million Canadians aged 15 years and older who reported having a disability in the survey.

Canadian Survey on Disability, 2012: “Learning disabilities among Canadians aged 15 years and older”

The Canadian Survey on Disability (CSD) is a national survey of Canadians aged 15 and over whose everyday activities are limited because of a long-term condition or health-related problem. This document contains survey results on the number of persons with learning disabilities, prevalence of disability, Learning disability by age, co-occurring disabilities, educational attainment and experiences as well as employment, Mental health disability in the work place, job modifications, hours worked, not in the labour force, job search barriers and income, for Canada.

Disability in Canada: Initial Findings from the Canadian Survey on Disability

The Canadian Survey on Disability (CSD) is a national survey of Canadians aged 15 and over whose everyday activities are limited because of a long-term condition or health-related problem. This document contains initial survey results on the number of persons with disabilities, prevalence of disability as well as the type and severity of disability, by age and sex, for Canada. For more information, please refer to the document “Canadian Survey on Disability 2012: Data Tables”.

Disability in Ontario: Postsecondary education participation rates, student experience and labour market outcomes

The number of students with disabilities at Ontario PSE institutions has increased in recent years and they still encounter barriers into, through, and after higher education, according to a synthesis of current research from the Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario. Research observes that more students with disabilities are pursuing PSE and are choosing college over university. Yet such students are less likely to graduate and often take longer to complete their studies. Students with disabilities are also more likely to drop out of secondary school. PSE applicants with disabilities tend to be older and are less likely to go to PSE directly from secondary school.

Health Reports – Positive mental health and mental illness

This analysis examines the prevalence and adjusted odds ratios of complete mental health in relation to socio-demographic and health correlates.

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