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/ Listing Categories / Industry

Content in this category pertains to material about specific industries in the Canadian economy.

2018-2027 Construction and Maintenance Looking Forward: Canada’s Territories

Construction activity in Canada is approaching a new plateau following two decades of almost uninterrupted growth during which the workforce doubled. The resource expansion, which propelled the rapid pace of growth over the last decade in many provinces, has given way to a new period in which demands are sustained at high levels by infrastructure renewal, stable residential demands, and steady increases in ICI (industrial, commercial, institutional) building construction and maintenance work, while industry grapples with responses to the anticipated retirement of one quarter of a million skilled workers over the coming decade. While the longer-term outlook is positive across most provinces, the pace of growth is expected to be slower compared to the past decade, and demands continue to shift toward meeting modest increases in infrastructure, sustaining capital, maintenance, and residential renovation requirements. Under the 2018–2027 outlook scenario, total construction employment is mostly unchanged at the end of the scenario period in 2027, as moderate gains in non- residential demands outpace small declines in residential. The outlook scenario reveals several key themes that emerge across the rest of Canada: ● Uncertainty surrounding future commodity prices and changing global demands has translated into delays and cancellations of some resource development projects across Canada. As a result, related engineering construction employment is expected to decline by 4 percent across the scenario period, partly offset by planned infrastructure investment. ● ICI building construction demands rise over the near term following recent population growth and a modest manufacturing recovery, but growth is moderate. ● Maintenance work (heavy industrial and non-residential buildings) is on a steady, but moderate increase across the decade, with larger than normal industrial demands expected in 2018 in Alberta and New Brunswick. ● Major public transportation and other infrastructure projects add to employment opportunities across most provinces, with an added boost by provincial and federal government long-term commitments to infrastructure renewal. The timing of new major projects is varied and irregular, and these changes drive most of the regional volatility in non-residential employment: ● In British Columbia, proposed LNG (liquefied natural gas) facilities, pipelines, and infrastructure projects increase non-residential employment by 24 percent between 2019 and 2021. ● In Alberta, demands are expected to continue to decline in 2018 as existing major oil sands projects near completion. Renewed growth in oil and gas investment is not anticipated until later in the scenario period and is expected to remain below previous peak levels of activity. ● A smaller rise is expected in Saskatchewan, sustained by rising industrial investment and high levels of highway and bridge work, while in Manitoba, major hydro and transmission project demands step down from record levels of activity. ● New Brunswick demands are sustained near current levels to 2020 before current projects wind down. The anticipated start of a major hydro refurbishment project should increase demands later in the scenario period. ● Most resource mega-projects in Newfoundland and Labrador are now complete, but further declines in employment are expected to continue over the near term as work on the Muskrat Falls hydro project is completed. The start of a new offshore platform only partly offsets expected employment declines. Despite slower employment growth across the rest of Canada, demographic trends add to market challenges. As population growth slows, there are less youth available to enter the workforce as construction retirements increase over the long term. An estimated 255,000 construction workers, or 21 percent of the 2017 workforce, are expected to retire over the next decade, and this represents a significant loss of skilled workers. View

A Strategic Direction for Technology Education and Skills in British Columbia

A new report from the Applied Science Technologists and Technicians of BC forecasts high demand for skilled jobs in technology and technical trades over the next several years, and argues BC is not adequately prepared to train enough young people to fill those jobs. According to the report, an estimated 25,000 new jobs requiring advanced technology or technical education will be created by 2020.

Annual Head Office Survey, 2011

From 2010 to 2011, the number of head offices declined 0.8% to 2,843. During the same period, the number of people employed in the head office industry rose 1.1% to 219,629.

Beyond the Horizon: Canada’s Interests and Future in Aerospace – November 2012

“Labour market forecasts indicate that specialized and experienced aerospace workers will be in short supply over the coming decades, particularly in engineering, technology, and supervisory occupations,” states the national Aerospace Review report, released yesterday. 

Canada’s Accommodation Industry: Industrial Outlook Summer 2013

This report examines the short-and medium-term economic and profitability outlook for Canada’s Accommodation Industry.

Canada’s Accommodation Industry: Industrial Outlook Winter 2014

This report examines the short-and medium-term economic and profitability outlook for Canada’s Accommodation Industry.

Canada’s Accommodation Industry: Industrial Profile 2013

This industry profile provides a five-year forecast for Canada’s Accommodation Industry.

Canada’s Air Transportation Industry: Industrial Outlook Summer 2013

This report examines the short-and medium-term economic and profitability outlook for Canada’s Air Transportation Industry.

Canada’s Air Transportation Industry: Industrial Outlook Summer 2013

This report examines the short-and medium-term economic and profitability outlook for Canada’s Air Transportation Industry.

Canada’s Air Transportation Industry: Industrial Outlook Winter 2014

This report examines the short-and medium-term economic and profitability outlook for Canada’s Air Transportation Industry.

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