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/ Listing Categories / Indigenous Peoples

Content in this category pertains to material dedicated to First Nations, Métis and Inuit Peoples in Canada.

Aboriginal Businesses Increasingly Embracing Innovation

This report takes advantage of data from the 2016 Promise and Prosperity survey to examine the state of Indigenous small business in Canada, their successes and challenges, and considers ways to further grow the sector. We find that although numerous barriers to growth persist, Aboriginal businesses are increasingly becoming important and innovative contributors to the Canadian economy.   View

Aboriginal Engagement in the Workforce

Overview of several programs provided by members of TASC to promote Aboriginal worker inclusion.

Aboriginal Participation in Trades and Apprenticeship in B.C. Three-Year Review and Future Direction

The BC Industry Training Authority has released a report on the progress of BC’s efforts to attract Aboriginal people to the trades in the province.  The report observes that over the past 5 years, the number of Aboriginal people participating in trades training at public PSE institutions in BC had doubled to more than 1,200 in each of the past 2 years.

Aboriginal peoples: Fact sheet for Canada

This product presents a summary of characteristics about the Aboriginal population living in Canada. Demographic data and information on living arrangements of children, education, employment, income, housing, health and language are highlighted. Data for each Aboriginal group, as well as data for the non-Aboriginal population, are provided separately for select variables. Findings are based on the 2011 National Household Survey, the 2012 Canadian Community Health Survey, and the 2012 Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

Aboriginal peoples: Fact sheets

Fact sheets on Aboriginal peoples in Canada’s provinces are now available. These fact sheets present a statistical overview of the socioeconomic characteristics of Aboriginal peoples in the provinces. They include information on living arrangements of children, education, employment, income, housing, health and languages of the Aboriginal population. Data are from the 2011 National Household Survey, the 2012 Aboriginal Peoples Survey and the 2012 Canadian Community Health Survey. 

Aboriginal peoples: Fact sheets

These fact sheets present a statistical overview of the socioeconomic characteristics of Aboriginal peoples in each of the territories and Inuit regions. They include information on living arrangements of children, education, employment, income, housing, health and languages of the Aboriginal population. Data are from the 2011 National Household Survey, the 2012 Aboriginal Peoples Survey and the 2012 Canadian Community Health Survey.

Aboriginal seniors in population centres in Canada

The Aboriginal population is a young population, with proportionally more children and youth and relatively few seniors. There is a demographic shift, however, towards aging among Aboriginal peoples. According to the 2001 Census and the 2011 National Household Survey, the number of Aboriginal people 65 years and over more than doubled from 2001 to 2011 to 82,690.

Aboriginal Statistics at a Glance: “2nd Edition”, 2009-2012

Aboriginal Statistics at a Glance is a thematic guide to Aboriginal data at Statistics Canada. Each theme is illustrated with a chart presenting statistical information on a basic indicator, a plain language definition and links to related information to further assist people in meeting their data needs.

Aboriginal Women Outperforming in the Labour Market

A new report suggests that Aboriginal women are outperforming other groups in labour market growth and have shown the greatest employment recovery since the recession when compared to Aboriginal men and non-Aboriginal people. The report, by TD Bank economist Brian DePratto, uses de-aggregated data from the 2011 National Household Survey and other sources, discovering that although there are persistent gaps remaining, overall the gaps are narrowing between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal women when it comes to employment rates and wage growth.

Breaking the Stereotype: Why Urban Aboriginals Score Highly on “Happiness” Measures

The report examines the life experiences of urban Aboriginal people. It argues that the two most important ways governments can increase urban Aboriginals’ sense of well-being are to increase their successful participation in the labour market and the education system.

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