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/ Listing Categories / Demographics

Content in this category pertains to material about population counts and projections.

2011 National Household Survey: Immigration and Ethnocultural Diversity in Canada

New data from the National Household Survey (NHS) show that Canada was home to about 6,775,800 foreign-born individuals in 2011. They represented 20.6% of the total population, compared with 19.8% in the 2006 Census. The country’s immigrant population, the ethnic backgrounds of its people, its visible minority population, and its linguistic and religious diversity showed that Canada is an ethnocultural mosaic.

A Long-Term View of Canada’s Changing Demographics: Are Higher Immigration Levels an Appropriate Response to Canada’s Aging Population?

This report measures how demographic changes, particularly to immigration levels or fertility rates, might reduce some of the economic and fiscal costs of an aging Canadian population.

A Snapshot of Military and Veteran Families in Canada

Canada’s military and Veteran families are diverse, resilient and strong, and they are a great source of pride for the country. They engage with – and play important roles in – their workplaces, communities and the country at large. Like all families, military and Veteran families access a variety of programs and services in their communities, including (but not limited to) child care and eldercare, health and mental health, community recreation and leisure, and education and employment. However, these programs and services are often delivered by professionals and practitioners who have little or no understanding of, or experience with, military and Veteran families. This lack of military literacy – awareness of the unique experiences of military and Veteran families and the “military life stressors” (mobility, separation and risk) that affect them – can result in negative experiences for both service providers and the families they seek to support.

Aboriginal peoples: Fact sheets

Fact sheets on Aboriginal peoples in Canada’s provinces are now available. These fact sheets present a statistical overview of the socioeconomic characteristics of Aboriginal peoples in the provinces. They include information on living arrangements of children, education, employment, income, housing, health and languages of the Aboriginal population. Data are from the 2011 National Household Survey, the 2012 Aboriginal Peoples Survey and the 2012 Canadian Community Health Survey. 

Aboriginal peoples: Fact sheets

These fact sheets present a statistical overview of the socioeconomic characteristics of Aboriginal peoples in each of the territories and Inuit regions. They include information on living arrangements of children, education, employment, income, housing, health and languages of the Aboriginal population. Data are from the 2011 National Household Survey, the 2012 Aboriginal Peoples Survey and the 2012 Canadian Community Health Survey.

An increasingly diverse linguistic landscape: Highlights from the 2016 Census

In 2016, almost 7.6 million Canadians reported speaking a language other than English or French at home, an increase of close to 1 million (+14.5%) people over 2011. However, English and French are still the languages of convergence and integration into Canadian society: 93.4% of Canadians speak English or French at least on a regular basis at home. View

An increasingly diverse linguistic profile: Data from the 2016 Census

Linguistic diversity is on the rise in Canada. Close to 7.6 million Canadians reported speaking a language other than English or French at home in 2016, an increase of almost 1 million (+14.5%) people over 2011. Moreover, the proportion of the Canadian population who speak more than one language at home rose from 17.5% in 2011 to 19.4% in 2016. In this context of increasing linguistic diversity, English and French remain the languages of convergence and integration into Canadian society: 93.4% of Canadians speak English or French at least on a regular basis at home. The rate of English–French bilingualism in Canada was 17.9% in 2016, the highest proportion ever. The previous high was 17.7% in 2001. There was a decline in French as a mother tongue (21.4% in 2016 compared with 22.0% in 2011) and as a language spoken at home (23.4% in 2016 versus 23.8% in 2011) throughout Canada.   View

An overview of Canada’s labour market from the National Household Survey

The second release from the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS) provided an update on the labour market outcomes of the Canadian population. Most of the information related to broad trends in the labour market can already be gleaned from the traditional sources of labour market information – Statistics Canada’s monthly Labour Force Survey (LFS) and the survey of employment, payrolls, and hours. As such, this note will focus more on information unique to the NHS, including the labour market outcomes of women, Aboriginals and immigrants.

Annual Demographic Estimates: Canada, Provinces and Territories, 2014

The report provides an overview of population growth across Canada with details by province/territories.

Annual Demographic Estimates: Canada, Provinces and Territories, 2015

This publication presents annual estimates of the total population and annual estimates by age and sex for Canada, provinces and territories. It also presents estimates of the following components of population change: births, deaths, immigration, emigration, returning emigration, net temporary emigration, net non-permanent residents and inter-provincial migration, the latter by origin and destination. As in the case of population estimates, the components are also available for the total population and by age and sex.

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