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The Decade After High School: A Parent’s Guide

The transition from high school into educational and occupational pathways is a bewildering process for many young people and their parents. From the time they start kindergarten to the day they graduate from high school, most youth travel down a relatively straightforward path. They proceed systematically from one grade to another. Everyone their age is doing pretty much what they are doing school-wise, and career decisions are something for the distant future.

This guide offers a glimpse into the world of today’s emerging adult. It describes the multiplicity of pathways that youth follow when training for and finding their way in a labour market that is vastly different from when we were starting out. This booklet is for parents; written to give you hope and guidance, offers practical suggestions for constructive roles you can play, activities you can undertake, and resources you can use as you help your children make informed, personally satisfying career decisions.


Read a review by in the Winter 2008 issue of the ContactPoint Bulletin.

You can purchase this publication online through the ContactPoint MarketPlace, or you can download a pdf for free.

Authors’ bios

Author’s bio CATHY CAMPBELL has been in the education field for over 20 years as a career counsellor, program developer, and program manager. As the former Director of a four-year federal demonstration project in PEI, she oversaw the development of a program of counselling and educational supports for high-risk young adults that effectively facilitated sustainable transitions to the workforce. She is now working as a counsellor with Career and Transitions Services, at the Nova Scotia Community College. In addition to holding a Bachelor of Education in experiential education and a Masters of Social Work from Wilfrid Laurier University., she has completed a post-graduate internship in career counselling at Dalhousie University. She has presented and published both locally and nationally on the topics of narrative career counseling and on the Parents as Career Coaches program.

MICHAEL UNGAR, Ph.D. is the author of seven books and more than 60 articles and book chapters. His works include Too Safe for their Own Good: How Risk and Responsibility Help Teens Thrive, Playing at Being Bad: The Hidden Resilience of Troubled Teens and Strengths-based Counseling with At-risk Youth. He has practiced for over 25 years as a Social Worker and Marriage and Family Therapist with children and families in child welfare, mental health, educational and correctional settings. Now a Professor at the School of Social Work, at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Canada, he leads an international team of resilience researchers that spans more than a dozen countries on six continents. In addition to his research and writing interests, Dr. Ungar maintains a small family therapy practice for troubled children, youth and their families. He lives in Halifax with his partner and their two teenaged children.

PEGGY DUTTON is a career development professional at Nova Scotia Community College.

Date of publication: 2008

Link: http://www.ceric.ca/?q=en/node/137

Publisher: CERIC

Author: Cathy Campbell, Michael Ungar, Peggy Dutton

About catherine

Catherine Ducharme is a bilingual communications specialist based in Toronto. She has been the Content and Communications Co-ordinator for the Canadian Education and Research Institute for Counselling (CERIC) since April 2012 and administers contactpoint.ca, an online community for career development professionals in Canada. She is also the editor of Careering magazine, the curator for the CareerWise newsletter and she leads francophone outreach at CERIC. Prior to joining CERIC, Catherine worked abroad for nearly two years and worked as a project manager for Quebec’s sector council for the community sector (CSMO-ÉSAC). She is also a translator.
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